If you had a knack for standardized tests and had no trouble acing the SAT, ACT or other college exams, why not start tutoring high schoolers as a side business idea? Parents of all economic backgrounds are more than willing to shell out upwards of $100/hr to the right tutor, if it means their son or daughter will get admitted to the college or university of their choice. See this quick checklist for starting an SAT tutoring business from the Work At Home Mom. Whitney over at Rookiemoms also has a cool story to share about a stay-at-home mom making $40/hr helping kids out with homework and turning it into a profitable side business idea.
Being a Loan Signing Agent is a great side hustle because you can make $75 to $200 per hour-long appointment working for yourself on your own schedule. Retired people, working professionals, and students can be signing agents and earn extra cash when they want. The best part is you need nothing more than a notary commission (which can often be attained by simply filling out an application)!
If you’re particularly adept at a subject and you find teaching to be a rewarding experience, a home tutoring business is a great way to supplement your income without taking up too much time. Tutors often charge between $30 and $40 an hour and with 3 students a day for 5 days a week, you can supplement your gross income in the amount of $450-$600.
Mechanical Turk operates much like TaskRabbit and GigWalk: it’s a corner online where Amazon gathers tasks to be done, people willing to do them, and people willing to pay for them. On Mechanical Turk, you get to do the oddest jobs you can imagine as an online business idea, made possible by a parallel online universe that runs on hits, visits, surveys, reviews, pins, likes, CPCs, reads, and other metrics. But don’t get too ambitious. The small sums being paid out to human Mechanical Turk users rarely add up to anything seriously substantial, even if you invest most of your spare time into it. It's a better opportunity for internationally-based people with internet access and lower costs of living than in the US. Here’s one person’s account of his former life as a Mechanical Turk talking through how he got started with  this business idea and what the experience was really like.

this is weird…but try day care centers. They are always looking for something to keep the older kids (who are only there after school…but ALLLLL summer) busy and interested. group classes could be great in the summer setting…a taste to let the kids (and parents) know if they want to pursue it. Also check out churches…they are always looking for wholesome activities for the youth too. You might even sign up a few adults along the way or offer a night time class for adults….especially one for women only. Good luck.
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