Furniture flipping is actually a really fun business. I’ve dabbled in this myself a time or two, and it’s a great way to make a few extra bucks if you don’t mind putting in the time. What you do is scour garage sales, Craigslist, or even the side of the road on trash day looking for furniture that’s in need of a little TLC. Then, take the time to fix, refinish, or paint the furniture, and resell it for a profit.
Before we go here, just wanted to share with you a great mindset to get into to help motivate your side hustlin’ even more. I call it the “Gigs For Goals” mindset and the idea behind it is that you attach all gigs of yours to a specific bill or a future want/need. If you can match them up to break even, you’re golden! If you fall short, you need to re-arrange your wants and/or start bringing in higher income streams to match ’em. It looks like this:
Fifty-one percent of millennials have at least occasional side hustles that they rely on for a cash stream outside their primary source of income, finds Bankrate. The personal finance site surveyed a little over 1,000 people across various age groups and income brackets and found that roughly 37 percent of Americans overall engage in a regular side hustle, including 28 percent who perform their side hustle at least once a month, if not more often.
Get a tax ID number. If you're starting your side business in the US, you need to apply for an Employer Identification Number (EIN) for your business from the IRS, even if you don't plan on having any employees. You typically need a separate tax ID for your business in most countries if you want to keep your side business legal and above-board.[13]
Take the time to develop your skills at either making your own music, or becoming a pro at mixing, and your side business idea of dj-ing local events could turn into a much bigger endeavor. Though you'll first need to command a solid knowledge of sound design, mixing and music production before expecting to land your first gig with this business idea, as developing an entirely new skill set is not for the faint of heart.
Painting house numbers on the curb – sales pitch is that it’s a safety benefit (fire, ambulance can find you faster), a convenience (particularly reflective numbers that help at night), even a legal requirement (in some towns). Capitalization super low. Add to your number-stencil inventory ones for locally popular sports teams, offering colors that declare team loyalty. Branch into mailboxes, mailbox posts, on-house numbers. If someone has missing or illegible numbers chances are it has been an irritant but not a priority – easier to sell something that scratches an itch. Outright artistic renditions or legible!-but-fancy fonts more practical on mailboxes. Fairly affordable capitalization to branch into outright replacement mailboxes, posts. Great earning opportunity for youngsters right in their own neighborhood.
This kind of goes with Amazon, eBay and Craigslist selling but dumpster diving is a good source of products to sell. I have found a few dumpsters in my area that regularly throw out valuable items I sell on one of the previously mentioned sites. My first week I found a large box of brand new toner bottles that cost $2400 on Amazon. I sold them for nearly $18oo individually over the couse of a month. Printing companies are good sources. I have gotten multiple printers, some working and some not but these are not $100 Walmart printers so even broken they can sell for enough to make it worth it or you can part it out too.

Firewood!!! I live in a semi-rural area about 1/2 hour North of Newcastle, Australia (houses on normal blocks, 1/2 acres blocks, “lifestyle” type blocks). A few people here will deliver a trailer load of cut up firewood for various amounts of money locally and into the more residential areas in the city. If you have the room to store firewood to season and a log splitter, its a good side income (for winter). I also know a lady who was struggling to find work after moving here. She started doing before and after school care and earns more doing that, than she did working full time in an office previously.

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