Mechanical Turk operates much like TaskRabbit and GigWalk: it’s a corner online where Amazon gathers tasks to be done, people willing to do them, and people willing to pay for them. On Mechanical Turk, you get to do the oddest jobs you can imagine as an online business idea, made possible by a parallel online universe that runs on hits, visits, surveys, reviews, pins, likes, CPCs, reads, and other metrics. But don’t get too ambitious. The small sums being paid out to human Mechanical Turk users rarely add up to anything seriously substantial, even if you invest most of your spare time into it. It's a better opportunity for internationally-based people with internet access and lower costs of living than in the US. Here’s one person’s account of his former life as a Mechanical Turk talking through how he got started with  this business idea and what the experience was really like.
Those who have experience in HR and a thorough understanding of Applicant Tracking Systems  (ATS) will do well. You will need a certain amount of people skills to attract clients, but the results will matter far more than how friendly and personable you are. If 90% of your clients find a job in their field after paying you a visit, these numbers will speak for themselves.

If you’re offering a service, do you need to be licensed and registered for it? Research the product or service you’re going to offer to determine exactly what you’ll need to do according to state law. If you’re going to help people with their taxes, for example, you’ll not only need to be licensed, registered, and bonded in some states, but you’ll also need to carry errors and omissions insurance.


Great post, MM! Incredibly inspiring, I really only grasped the side hustle concept since starting my blog about 6 months ago, after reading sites like yours. Already, apart from my blog, I’ve put my personal recording studio into use and started a music production side hustle, and a friend and I have launched a boutique logo design start up, called BroGoLogo, as an quality alternative to commodity products/services that you mention in this post.
A college planning business’ volume is very seasonal. In the fall, most high school seniors begin to seriously consider which college they’ll be attending. As this is such a big decision, many students stress over which college is the right choice for them. This is where you come in. Since peak demand is in the fall, this business won’t require too much of your time throughout the year, making it a convenient side business that’ll also prove lucrative.
this is weird…but try day care centers. They are always looking for something to keep the older kids (who are only there after school…but ALLLLL summer) busy and interested. group classes could be great in the summer setting…a taste to let the kids (and parents) know if they want to pursue it. Also check out churches…they are always looking for wholesome activities for the youth too. You might even sign up a few adults along the way or offer a night time class for adults….especially one for women only. Good luck.
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