Create a formal business structure. Even if you're just starting a side business that you don't think will ever grow large enough for you to quit your main job, you still need to treat it as a serious business and follow the necessary formalities to keep it separate from your personal income and assets. In the United States and many other countries, you have the option of organizing your side business as a corporation, a limited liability company (LLC), or a sole proprietorship.[11]

This business is great for artists, giving them a venue to create their own designs and sell them via t-shirts. It is also great for those with strong community ties, as it lets them build long-lasting relationships providing t-shirts for various high school clubs, small businesses, local churches, and other organizations. Finally, it's a good business for savvy social media users as they can leverage these skills to reach diverse audiences of customers online.
I’ve had other acquaintances buy the rights to unpopular songs or jingles and collect on royalties, others who buy Youtube channels or Instagram accounts, and still others who buy Amazon businesses. The list of existing assets you can buy are practically endless, and if you have one or two ideas for improving an asset, you could have a winner on your hands.
Many people choose to start a side business while still maintaining a full-time job. Maybe you want to generate a little extra income, or you believe you have a good idea for a product or service that's going to take awhile to get up and running. Whatever your reason, starting a side business can be difficult, but you can do it if you test your idea and keep everything well separated from your day job. Spend time researching your idea so you know the need is there to make it worth your time and effort. Once you know your business idea is solid, get your licenses and permits in order and check over your employer's policies to make sure you can start your side business and still keep your day job.[1]
If you have marketable skills as a developer, designer, or online marketer, there's an online audience who’d be willing to pay for your expertise, in order to become experts, too. Start by testing your way into the market on Udemy or Skillshare, where there’s already an existing audience for career-related courses. As you build your brand, aim for teaching on higher-visibility online education platforms like CreativeLive.
According to FlexJobs, the top fields for at-home work are healthcare, customer service, sales, information technology, and education. By taking Glassdoor’s list of 2018’s top-paying jobs and comparing it to their list of remote jobs, FlexJobs was able to compile a database of the top-paying remote jobs of 2018. Here are six of 2018’s highest paying jobs that you can do from anywhere in the world.

Obviously, everyone has different things going on in life, so if you’re in a season where you can’t focus on your side hustle, it may not be a good time to start one. You could wait to start one until a better time for you (although I recommend putting a date on the calendar for this if there’s ever going to be a chance you follow through). If you’re just “busy” in life but it’s a normal season, they just go for it and give yourself a set schedule of when you’ll work on it every day.

However, suppose you've always been interested in photography and want to start a side business offering your services as a photographer for weddings and other special events. Depending on your work schedule, this could potentially interfere with your day job – and your day job also could interfere with your side business. For example, you might get offered a well-paid and prestigious photography gig to shoot an event that takes place at a date and time when you're scheduled to work.


Not to be confused with hoarding, this business idea takes a lot of time, patience, and passion. If you have an eye for good art, it’s easy to get in on the ground level by visiting the studio department at your local university—though don't expect to get rich overnight with this side business idea. Many art students are more than happy to sell their work for a bargain, and in as little as a few years, there's a chance that piece you bought for a couple hundred bucks may be worth well into the thousands. Beware though, this business idea will take a whole lot of patience (and storage space for all that art).
Affiliate marketing is one of those side hustle ideas that can either make you a lot of money or nothing. It’s not just about finding the right product to sell, but also finding the right brand to partner with. If you chose to be an affiliate marketer for ecommerce stores, your commission will likely be a lot lower than if you were just to dropship them yourself. However, there are tech companies who will pay a hefty price tag to affiliates who bring them new customers.
It’s also important that other people are already doing it because that means there’s a market for it. Your side hustle needs to be profitable – it has to make money. There is no point in starting a business that won’t be profitable. So, make sure there is a market for it. People mistakenly think that because an area already is filled with people making money that it’s too saturated, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. That just means there’s money to be made in that space.
Most of us struggle with selling our own experience and skills. Looking for a new job can be an extremely stressful and frustrating experience, so it’s not unusual for job hunters to turn to experts for a bit of help and guidance. Whether you have some recruitment experience or a knack for clear communication, CV and cover letter writing could be just the right side gig idea for you. Experts at Stand Out Shop are cleverly combining CV writing service with selling downloadable resume designs, so think big and think about offering the ultimate job hunter’s package. Don’t know where to start? Use your LinkedIn network to generate leads and promote your services.
Take the time to develop your skills at either making your own music, or becoming a pro at mixing, and your side business idea of dj-ing local events could turn into a much bigger endeavor. Though you'll first need to command a solid knowledge of sound design, mixing and music production before expecting to land your first gig with this business idea, as developing an entirely new skill set is not for the faint of heart.
CHRIS GUILLEBEAU is the New York Times bestselling author of books including The $100 Startup, The Happiness of Pursuit, and The Art of Non-Conformity. He is also the founder and host of Side Hustle School, a daily podcast with more than 2 million downloads per month. During a lifetime of self-employment and side hustling, he visited every country in the world (193 in total) before his 35th birthday.

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I was a flower girl when I lived in Hawaii, I would work evenings after my 10 hour shift at a resort as a manicurist. The Flower business owner would cut and prepare gardenias, orchids. carnations in a water vial. I also carried Hawaiian Leis . I would drive to restaurants and clubs that she had prearranged permission with the business owners, I would walk around without being salesy carrying my pretty basket of flowers and smile at everyone. The flowers would sell out in a couple of hours and I would go home with an extra 300 to 500 a night. if I lived in a big city now I would do this on my own. it was the easiest money I ever made. some nights I’d sell out in an hour!
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