First, decide the composition of your target audience. Are you going to focus on aging skin-care products, or cosmetics for teens and tweens? Do you want to hit the burgeoning natural product market? Once you have a sense of who you are selling to, you will need to decide if you want to make your own products, or work and receive commission from a larger company.
Consider your business plan to develop a picture of goals and timelines. For instance, if you want to turn a side business into a full-time venture later on, come up with a rough idea of when you’d like to begin this transition. Create a schedule by mapping out yearly, monthly, and weekly goals, and keep track of them along the way. Making and meeting goals will help you stay on your timeline, which will help ensure your business’ success. On the other hand, if you don’t intend to leave your full-time job, determine how much time you’re willing to put into it on a daily and weekly basis, and then create a plan to help you stick with it.
Remember my earlier post about breakfast burritos? Making meals in advance is a great way to save money for yourself – but you can often prepare these for others as well and sell them for a markup. Prepare eight casseroles, for example, then sell six of them to cover your costs, and you’ve got two free dinners for your family (and maybe a bit more). You can grow this by taking orders from others and finding out what they like.
I surprisingly get a lot of people asking to detail their car. I never intend to make a business of it, but I love doing it to my cars and people ask me to do it to theirs. All it takes is a cheap orbital buffer (mines a used craftsman) and a shop vac. I normally get easily $100 for a basic wash/wax/vac, or $200 to remove scratches and polish then wax the car.
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